The Latest

youmightfindyourself:

A perfect soft-boiled egg is a thing of beauty: a yolk with the texture of sweet condensed milk surrounded by a white that is tender but not runny. But for generations, great cooks have differed on how to achieve this state of perfection reliably.
Some authorities say you should drop a whole egg into boiling water for about three minutes—a bit longer if the egg is extra-large—and then gently peel away the shell. That can leave the yolk too runny, however. And when the egg is peeled, it’s all too easy to tear the tender white into a mess.
The legendary Julia Child advocated a six-minute boil (for large eggs starting at room temperature, or a minute longer if chilled), followed by a rinse with cold water before and also during peeling. That certainly works for the white, but often overcooks the center.
The French food scientist Hervé This argued some years ago that temperature, not time, is all that matters to the egg—cook it to 65 °C / 149 °F, and the result will be heavenly no matter how long it sits in the water. Or so it was thought. For a while, the “65°C egg” was all the rage at high-end restaurants.
But more recent research by the food chemist Cesar Vega , an editor and co‑author of the 2012 book The Kitchen as Laboratory, conclusively showed that both time and temperature matter. Moreover, the white and the yolk contain different blends of proteins, so the white gels at a higher temperature and a different rate than the yolk does. Vega’s rigorous experiments have armed scientifically inclined chefs with the information they need to cook eggs to whatever texture they like.
When the chefs in our research kitchen make soft-boiled eggs, they use a four‑step process that involves a blowtorch or liquid nitrogen. Here is a simpler version better suited to the home kitchen. You’ll need a pot of boiling water, a bowl of ice water, a temperature-controlled water bath, and, if you plan on peeling the eggs, a toaster oven.
The first step is to set the egg whites quickly by submerging them completely in a pot of rapidly boiling water for three minutes and 30 seconds—15–30 seconds less if you like the whites quite loose, as our research chefs do, or 15–30 seconds longer if you prefer the whites fully set. When the time is up, plunge the eggs into the ice water to cool them completely.
Next, cook the yolks to a syrup-like thickness by submerging the eggs in a 64 °C / 147 °F water bath for 35 minutes; it’s important that the water temperature doesn’t change more than a degree or two during cooking. Dry the eggs thoroughly with paper towels. They are now ready to place in egg holders, top, and eat with a spoon. (If you have a Dremel or similar handheld rotary tool, use a thin grinder bit to top the eggs like a pro.)
Alternatively, you can make the eggs easier to peel by drying the shells in a toaster oven. Use a medium-dark toaster setting, and let the eggs heat for two to three minutes to make the shell hot and brittle. It will then readily flake away to reveal a flawless white beneath. Remember to remove the thin skin around the white if it doesn’t come off with the shell.
You can make these eggs in advance and later reheat them in a 60 °C / 140 °F bath for 30 minutes.
By adjusting the temperature of the cooking bath or the time the eggs are in it, you can achieve all kinds of delicious results—and reproduce them flawlessly time after time. Prefer a yolk that is more like honey? Let the egg sit in a 65 °C bath for 45 minutes. For a runnier center, try our recipe for Liquid Center Eggs.
Or try cooking them in a 72 °C / 162 °F bath for 35 minutes (you can skip the boiling step). The yolk will then set just firmly enough that you can peel away the white to obtain a perfect yellow sphere, which makes a striking garnish or dumpling-like addition to a soup.
It’s remarkable how advances in science and precision cooking have given new life to this versatile food.
From Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking, a six-volume, 2,400-page set that reveals science-inspired techniques for preparing food that ranges from the otherworldly to the sublime.
May 29, 2013 / 267 notes

youmightfindyourself:

A perfect soft-boiled egg is a thing of beauty: a yolk with the texture of sweet condensed milk surrounded by a white that is tender but not runny. But for generations, great cooks have differed on how to achieve this state of perfection reliably.

Some authorities say you should drop a whole egg into boiling water for about three minutes—a bit longer if the egg is extra-large—and then gently peel away the shell. That can leave the yolk too runny, however. And when the egg is peeled, it’s all too easy to tear the tender white into a mess.

The legendary Julia Child advocated a six-minute boil (for large eggs starting at room temperature, or a minute longer if chilled), followed by a rinse with cold water before and also during peeling. That certainly works for the white, but often overcooks the center.

The French food scientist Hervé This argued some years ago that temperature, not time, is all that matters to the egg—cook it to 65 °C / 149 °F, and the result will be heavenly no matter how long it sits in the water. Or so it was thought. For a while, the “65°C egg” was all the rage at high-end restaurants.

But more recent research by the food chemist Cesar Vega , an editor and co‑author of the 2012 book The Kitchen as Laboratory, conclusively showed that both time and temperature matter. Moreover, the white and the yolk contain different blends of proteins, so the white gels at a higher temperature and a different rate than the yolk does. Vega’s rigorous experiments have armed scientifically inclined chefs with the information they need to cook eggs to whatever texture they like.

When the chefs in our research kitchen make soft-boiled eggs, they use a four‑step process that involves a blowtorch or liquid nitrogen. Here is a simpler version better suited to the home kitchen. You’ll need a pot of boiling water, a bowl of ice water, a temperature-controlled water bath, and, if you plan on peeling the eggs, a toaster oven.

The first step is to set the egg whites quickly by submerging them completely in a pot of rapidly boiling water for three minutes and 30 seconds—15–30 seconds less if you like the whites quite loose, as our research chefs do, or 15–30 seconds longer if you prefer the whites fully set. When the time is up, plunge the eggs into the ice water to cool them completely.

Next, cook the yolks to a syrup-like thickness by submerging the eggs in a 64 °C / 147 °F water bath for 35 minutes; it’s important that the water temperature doesn’t change more than a degree or two during cooking. Dry the eggs thoroughly with paper towels. They are now ready to place in egg holders, top, and eat with a spoon. (If you have a Dremel or similar handheld rotary tool, use a thin grinder bit to top the eggs like a pro.)

Alternatively, you can make the eggs easier to peel by drying the shells in a toaster oven. Use a medium-dark toaster setting, and let the eggs heat for two to three minutes to make the shell hot and brittle. It will then readily flake away to reveal a flawless white beneath. Remember to remove the thin skin around the white if it doesn’t come off with the shell.

You can make these eggs in advance and later reheat them in a 60 °C / 140 °F bath for 30 minutes.

By adjusting the temperature of the cooking bath or the time the eggs are in it, you can achieve all kinds of delicious results—and reproduce them flawlessly time after time. Prefer a yolk that is more like honey? Let the egg sit in a 65 °C bath for 45 minutes. For a runnier center, try our recipe for Liquid Center Eggs.

Or try cooking them in a 72 °C / 162 °F bath for 35 minutes (you can skip the boiling step). The yolk will then set just firmly enough that you can peel away the white to obtain a perfect yellow sphere, which makes a striking garnish or dumpling-like addition to a soup.

It’s remarkable how advances in science and precision cooking have given new life to this versatile food.

From Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking, a six-volume, 2,400-page set that reveals science-inspired techniques for preparing food that ranges from the otherworldly to the sublime.

JKT Hidden Guide, JSDA. The merge of city guide and notebook. #stationary #design #cityguide   (Taken with Instagram)
Aug 8, 2012 / 1 note

JKT Hidden Guide, JSDA. The merge of city guide and notebook. #stationary #design #cityguide (Taken with Instagram)

A president something-something should be able to produce such words. (Gabrielle Centazzo-Valcucine president)  (Taken with Instagram)
Aug 6, 2012

A president something-something should be able to produce such words. (Gabrielle Centazzo-Valcucine president) (Taken with Instagram)

Aug 2, 2012

Dogs and Don’ts

 
“I Pet a Carrot so a Rabbit Will Come”

2010

“Friend’s Best Friend”

2010

I was afraid of dogs until I got into university 6 years ago. Dogs were always move uncontrollably, unlike cats who moves in a very tactical way. Since my religion doesn’t really befriend with dogs especially its saliva, their unpredictable movement is not the best character to build a friendship between me and them. But nowadays our relationship is getting better, a little bit, example: I started to be brave enough to touch their neck and head. Tsk, loser me.

The improvement starts when some of my friend at college having a gathering between dogs owner and lover in   our university front yard. They call the gathering Dog’s Day Out.

Dog’s Day Out now has become a community and call themselves Dog’s Day Out Indonesia. Some of the founder were my friends and one of them organizing a project called Project Bark. At first my friend ask people to draw something correlate with dogs and he will post it on the website. I join one of the firsts project and submit 2 drawing (as seen above).

“I Pet a Carrot so a Rabbit Will Come” was expressing a joke that sometimes when you pet a cute dog then girls will come and realizing about you too. When it comes to pet a carrot, what will come is a rabbit. What I mean is, there were always some attraction to people who pet something.

While my other drawing, “Friend’s Best Friend” is the fusion of one of my besties with her besties, a beagle.

Even I don’t do dogs but they are unmistakably a great partner to human since centuries ago and especially a great one to my best friend and friends at DDOI.

Check out the website of Project Bark, great artworks compilation.

Aug 2, 2012 / 2 notes

Books Actually Filled with Books

Recently, I read a New York Times article from its website that tells the author experience of travelling and visiting places based on bloggers review. Which turns out giving the author a very nice experience.

I was in Singapore for a few days in early 2012 and it’s been long since the last time I visit Singapore. What the author of NY Times did was exactly what I did too. I google some review and crosschecked it with a blogger’s review. I don’t buy travel guide books. Turns out I found some great places in Singapore such as Papa Palheta, Kith’s Cafe and this time Books Actually.

Books Actually is a local independent book store that also sells stationery and vintage goods. The place is really simple and crammed with books. I don’t know how they organize the shelves but the store can be categorized as organized-mess and not everyone succeeded in making those type of retail store. The organizing of the books kind of making me browse for hours there but I think that is the charm!

The place use yellow lighting that makes everything looks nice. They use the ever popular chalkboard in the front of the store. Wooden shelves, white wall, vintage goods, item in display here and there. Nothing pretencious here. Conclusion is, the store is crafted with passion and taste which you don’t find in retail book store.

(Everyone has been realizing the beauty of chalkboard over whiteboard though, careful not to make it overrated though)

In one of the  table there are stacked books by Singapore’s authors which published by Math Paper Press that is also parts of Books Actually too.

The design of these books from Singapore’s author is simple with ivory paper and black and white graphic. Should have bought one from many options they have, tsk, consider it as a regret.

Below are the quirkiest recipe book that ever see! gonna buy it when I visit Books Actually again!

I bought a general read though, a novel by Haruki Murakami, Monocle Newspaper and some cute wood pencils engraved with famous author name such as Ernest Hemingway as a souvenir for friends in Indonesia.

As I think about Books Actually again, I think I really should develop such bookstore in Jakarta, there weren’t any book store such as Books Actually been developed!

Certainly going to walk behind those buildings and swing that door again, dear Books Actually!

Here’s the address:

No. 9 Yong Siak Street
Tiong Bahru Estate

Believe me, do believe a blogger’s review :)

Aug 2, 2012 / 5 notes

siapagembonk:

Chalkforcheese - Bercerita Jingga

Trianzani Sulshi : vocal 
Ferdy Apriady : saxophone 
Martin Handy : guitar 
Ferry Nurhayat : keyboard/shyntesizer 
Iman Rahman : bass 
Arif Baradja : drum 
Eva Pauline Sandan : back. voc. 
Natashia Dwiyanita : back. voc.

thingssheloves:

Capri, Italy
Jul 22, 2012 / 395 notes

thingssheloves:

Capri, Italy

Jun 18, 2012

I found myself crying over a picture of crackling fires. Funny how fire able to shower such pain through pictures, funny how we stupidly always correlate it with harsh ending. The burning of all things.

Jun 18, 2012

All things burn. Candles-obviously, money-carelessly, heart-excruciatingly, mind-silently. You and I, we all-eventually.

flyafoto:

Rio de Janeiro - Amsterdam - Osaka
Jun 18, 2012 / 4 notes
Jun 16, 2012

The whole chocolates are beautiful! and David Lebovitz’s way of presenting the factory making it more interesting. :D

The French never said something with “very good” they only say “pretty good”.

Women are boring.
Jun 16, 2012
Jun 16, 2012 / 1 note

“BANDUNG IN MILK CHOCOLATE”

There are few most basic and boring souvenir that one can get to bring home from overseas: fridge magnet, t-shirt and chocolate.

I am a designer and I don’t want just any chocolate and I promise to bring home some souvenirs for my friends (whom all designers too).  So this time I was bought by a review —again, actually— by Wallpaper Magazine.

The name of the chocolate store is Chocolate Research Facility. Wallpaper Magazine boasts its neat and chic packaging that contains popping graphic or photo. The store does offer wide range and interesting mix of chocolate which is not often found in the market and it means they are responsible to the name they have chosen. There are series of the chocolate: Fruit Series, Tea Series, Seasonal Series, Coffee Series and many others.

Personally I am interested with the Tea Series. They have Chocolate with Rose Hip Tea which I would not be able to find such taste in Indonesia. But the most fascinating series are yet revealed until I saw the Heritage Series. When I visit Chocolate Research Facility, they have this A/W 11 series and one of the chocolate was titled “Bandung in Milk Chocolate“!

I am truly excited with the name! The chocolate has 3 layers of color/taste: Chocolate, pink, chocolate. The whole taste were like Indonesian beverages that often can be found on the street: the pink cendol.

I don’t exactly know what is this taste derives from but it just really resembles cendol.

A box of chocolate were tagged with a range of S$ 6 – 10.

Above: the Chocolate Research Facility store.

After buying some chocolate I sit down awhile and enjoy a cup of hot chocolate!

Those who wants to get some serious chic sweet tooth, this is the address of Chocolate Research Facility:

Millenia Walk #01-30

also visit their Chocolate Research Facility website to learn more about the fascinating world of their chocolate!

Fryza Pavitta

— Singapore

Jun 16, 2012

THE GOOD NEIGHBOR, KITH CAFE

It was a pleasant warm weather in the morning of Singapore. I have planned to try and visit Kith’s Cafe since I got some good review about it.

I tell my driver the address and got lost a little. He himself not very convinced that such address will be filled with restaurant worth to visit by tourists. The address was an apartment complex.

The complex was a quiet and dull one in my quick opinion and I can’t directly see where Kith’s Cafe really is.

Reducing my own worries of stupidly-believing-random-reviews, I walks a little bit to look for this Kith’s Cafe and turn around on the corner of the building that leads to the back of it. A beautiful river bank and some patch of green grasses were decorating the panorama from the back of the building. In the midst of quiet and dullness of the building (besides the view) there were suddenly an area that’s filled with people.

There it is, the Kith’s Cafe and it is small.

Small, but hey! it’s full with dine-in customer! Some of them sit in the terrace enjoying the weather and I got the seat inside.

It’s small, with big menu. It’s small but offers a great refreshment for breakfast and lunch. Not forgetting the coffee off course.

Looking out again, I realize there’s another cafe around but the only one’s crowded was Kith’s Cafe.

Me and my traveling partner try the ham sandwich and the chicken sandwich with chips alongside fresh juices.

I think that Singapore had so many interesting place to offer than just malls and H & M. The kind of Kith’s Cafe and Papa Palheta are treasures that bound the tourist to the community of Singapore. Tourist should try harder though, than just get in to the stores in Orchard.

Though my partner said that I suddenly grew silent and weird while we were eating there, the good weather and the fact we found Kith’s Cafe cover it all up.


Ps: Dear, I’m glad we were there :D sorry for the silence. You know, we are that much lost in translation. 

For those who wanted to have a warm welcoming breakfast, this is the address of Kith’s Cafe:

7 Rodyk Street, #01-33 Watermark @Robertson Quay, Singapore


Fryza Pavitta

— Singapore

Sea Turtle
2012

It’s Nothing and Everything
It’s here but not here. It stays but already left. It’s warm and also a piercing cold.
This may mean nothing and also everything.
Jun 15, 2012 / 2 notes

Sea Turtle

2012


It’s Nothing and Everything

It’s here but not here. It stays but already left. It’s warm and also a piercing cold.

This may mean nothing and also everything.